A Study of Decadence, Romanticism, Resistance to Change, and Social Cataclysm in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby”

  • Hussein Zaboon Mutashar, Ahmed Hasan Mousa

Abstract

The study aims at investigating the role played by social class and status in shaping peoples’ life in F. Scott Fitzgeralds “The Great Gatsby” (1926). Drawing on Max Weber's theory of class and status and through the analysis of the novel, the study sheds lights on decadence, romanticism, resistance to change, and social cataclysm to expose their influences on humans’ behaviour.  It focuses on how the presence of social class affects the relationships between the different characters in the novel and reflects the changing society, the norms as well as values. The study ends with a conclusion that decadence, romanticism, resistance to change, and social cataclysm are factors that determine and influence the characters’ opinions, decisions and relationships. Consequently, this leads to an inevitable end to Gatsby’s and Daisy’s love affair as well as the consequences of other characters’ actions are impacted by their social class.

Published
2020-06-01